A large foodborne outbreak of norovirus in diners at a restaurant in England between January and February 2009

A. J. Smith*, N. McCarthy, L. Saldana, C. Ihekweazu, K. McPhedran, Goutam Adak, Miren Iturriza-Go'Mara, G. Bickler, É O'Moore

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An outbreak of gastroenteritis affected at least 240 persons who had eaten at a gourmet restaurant over a period of 7 weeks in 2009 in England. Epidemiological, microbiological, and environmental studies were conducted. The case-control study demonstrated increased risk of illness in those who ate from a special 'tasting menu' and in particular an oyster, passion fruit jelly and lavender dish (odds ratio 7.0, 95% confidence interval 1.1-45.2). Ten diners and six staff members had laboratory-confirmed norovirus infection. Diners were infected with multiple norovirus strains belonging to genogroups I and II, a pattern characteristic of molluscan shellfish-associated outbreaks. The ongoing risk from dining at the restaurant may have been due to persistent contamination of the oyster supply alone or in combination with further spread via infected food handlers or the restaurant environment. Delayed notification of the outbreak to public health authorities may have contributed to outbreak size and duration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1695-1701
Number of pages7
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume140
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • Case-control study
  • foodborne outbreak
  • norovirus
  • oysters
  • shellfish

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A large foodborne outbreak of norovirus in diners at a restaurant in England between January and February 2009'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this