Age, time living with diagnosed HIV infection, and self-rated health

the Antiretrovirals, Sexual Transmission Risk and Attitudes (ASTRA) Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: An increasing proportion of people living with HIV are older adults, who may require specialized care. Adverse physical and psychological effects of HIV infection may be greatest among older people or those who have lived longer with HIV. Methods: The ASTRA study is a cross-sectional questionnaire study of 3258 HIV-diagnosed adults (2248 men who have sex with men, 373 heterosexual men and 637 women) recruited from UK clinics in 2011–2012. Associations of age group with physical symptom distress (significant distress for at least one of 26 symptoms), depression and anxiety symptoms (scores ≥ 10 on PHQ-9 and GAD-7, respectively), and health-related functional problems (problems on at least one of three domains of the Euroqol 5D-3L)) were assessed, adjusting for time with diagnosed HIV infection, gender/sexual orientation and ethnicity. Results: The age distribution of participants was: < 30 years, 5%; 30–39 years, 23%; 40–49 years, 43%; 50–59 years, 22%; and ≥ 60 years, 7%. Overall prevalences were: physical symptom distress, 56%; depression symptoms, 27%; anxiety symptoms, 22%; functional problems, 38%. No trend was found in the prevalence of physical symptom distress with age [adjusted odds ratio (OR) for trend across age groups, 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89, 1.04; P = 0.36]. The prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms decreased with age [adjusted OR 0.86 (95% CI 0.79, 0.94; P = 0.001) and adjusted OR 0.85 (95% CI 0.77, 0.94; P = 0.001), respectively], while that of functional problems increased (adjusted OR 1.28; 95% CI 1.17, 1.39; P < 0.001). In contrast, a longer time with diagnosed HIV infection was strongly and independently associated with a higher prevalence of symptom distress, depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and functional problems (P < 0.001 for trends, adjusted analysis). Conclusions: Among people living with HIV, although health-related functional problems were more common with older age, physical symptom distress was not, and mental health was more favourable. These results suggest that a longer time with diagnosed HIV infection, rather than age, is the dominating factor contributing to psychological morbidity and lower quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-103
Number of pages15
JournalHIV Medicine
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
All ASTRA study participants and ASTRA clinic teams are thanked for taking part in the study. Funding and support: The ASTRA study presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under its Programme Grants for Applied Research funding scheme (RP-PG-0608-10142). The ASTRA Study Group acknowledges the support of the NIHR, through the Comprehensive Clinical Research Network. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 The Authors. HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association

Keywords

  • HIV
  • ageing
  • anxiety
  • depression
  • symptoms
  • wellbeing

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