An evaluation of the species and subspecies of the genus Salmonella with whole genome sequence data: Proposal of type strains and epithets for novel S. enterica subspecies VII, VIII, IX, X and XI

Madison E. Pearce, Gemma C. Langridge, A. C. Lauer, Kathie Grant, Martin C.J. Maiden, Marie A. Chattaway*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Species and subspecies within the Salmonella genus have been defined for public health purposes by biochemical properties; however, reference laboratories have increasingly adopted sequence-based, and especially whole genome sequence (WGS), methods for surveillance and routine identification. This leads to potential disparities in subspecies definitions, routine typing, and the ability to detect novel subspecies. A large-scale analysis of WGS data from the routine sequencing of clinical isolates was employed to define and characterise Salmonella subspecies population structure, demonstrating that the Salmonella species and subspecies were genetically distinct, including those previously identified through phylogenetic approaches, namely: S. enterica subspecies londinensis (VII), subspecies brasiliensis (VIII), subspecies hibernicus (IX) and subspecies essexiensis (X). The analysis also identified an additional novel subspecies, reptilium (XI). Further, these analyses indicated that S. enterica subspecies arizonae (IIIa) isolates were divergent from the other S. enterica subspecies, which clustered together and, on the basis of ANI analysis, subspecies IIIa was sufficiently distinct to be classified as a separate species, S. arizonae. Multiple phylogenetic and statistical approaches generated congruent results, suggesting that the proposed species and subspecies structure was sufficiently biologically robust for routine application. Biochemical analyses demonstrated that not all subspecies were distinguishable by these means and that biochemical approaches did not capture the genomic diversity of the genus. We recommend the adoption of standardised genomic definitions of species and subspecies and a genome sequence-based approach to routine typing for the identification and definition of novel subspecies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3152-3162
Number of pages11
JournalGenomics
Volume113
Issue number5
Early online date7 Jul 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This research was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Gastrointestinal Infections at University of Liverpool in partnership with Public Health England (PHE), in collaboration with University of East Anglia, University of Oxford and the Quadram Institute (no. 109524). Madison Pearce was based at the University of Oxford. The views expressed are those of the author (s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, the Department of Health, Public Health England, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Quadram Insititue. GCL was funded by the BBSRC Institute Strategic Programme Microbes in the Food Chain BB/R012504/1 and its constituent project BBS/E/F/000PR10352.

Open Access: No Open Access licence

Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Published by Elsevier Inc.

Citation: Madison E. Pearce, Gemma C. Langridge, A.C. Lauer, Kathie Grant, Martin C.J. Maiden, Marie A. Chattaway, An evaluation of the species and subspecies of the genus Salmonella with whole genome sequence data: Proposal of type strains and epithets for novel S. enterica subspecies VII, VIII, IX, X and XI, Genomics, Volume 113, Issue 5, 2021, Pages 3152-3162, ISSN 0888-7543.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygeno.2021.07.003.

Keywords

  • Brasiliensis
  • Essexiensis
  • Genomics
  • Hibernicus
  • Londinensis
  • Reptilium
  • Salmonella

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