Chlamydia and HIV testing, contraception advice, and free condoms offered in general practice: A qualitative interview study of young adults' perceptions of this initiative

Leah Ffion Jones, Ellie Ricketts, Katy Town, Claire Rugman, Donna Lecky, Kate Folkard, Anthony Nardone, Thomas Nathan Hartney, Cliodna McNulty*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Opportunistic chlamydia screening is actively encouraged in English general practices. Based on recent policy changes, Public Health England piloted 3Cs and HIV in 2013-2014, integrating the offer of chlamydia testing with providing condoms, contraceptive information, and HIV testing (referred to as 3Cs and HIV) according to national guidelines. Aim To determine young adults' opinions of receiving a broader sexual health offer of 3Cs and HIV at their GP practice. Design and setting Qualitative interviews were conducted in a general practice setting in England between March and June 2013. Method Thirty interviews were conducted with nine male and 21 female patients aged 16-24 years, immediately before or after a routine practice attendance. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic framework. Results Participants indicated that the method of testing, timing, and the way the staff member approached the topic were important aspects to patients being offered 3Cs and HIV. Participants displayed a clear preference for 3Cs and HIV to be offered at the GP practice over other sexual health service providers. Participants highlighted convenience of the practice, assurance of confidentiality, and that the sexual health discussion was appropriate and routine. Barriers identified for patients were embarrassment, unease, lack of time, religion, and patients believing that certain patients could take offence. Suggested facilitators include raising awareness, reassuring confidentiality, and ensuring the offer is made in a professional and non-judgemental way at the end of the consultation. Conclusion General practice staff should facilitate patients' preferences by ensuring that 3Cs and HIV testing services are made available at their surgery and offered to appropriate patients in a non-judgemental way.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e490-e500
JournalBritish Journal of General Practice
Volume67
Issue number660
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© British Journal of General Practice 2017.

Copyright:
Copyright 2018 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Chlamydia screening
  • General practice
  • HIV testing
  • Patient preference
  • Primary health care
  • Sexual health
  • Young people

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