Clostridium difficile toxin testing by National Health Service (NHS) acute Trusts in England: 2008-2013

S. M. Gerver*, Alan Johnson, Russell Hope

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In October 2007, a governmental 3-year target to reduce Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) by 30%, with financial penalties levied for failure, was introduced in England. This target was met within just 1 year, leading to speculation of 'gaming', with hospitals empirically treating possible CDI in the absence of a microbiological diagnosis, to avoid having to report confirmed cases. An analysis of aggregate mandatory data on levels of testing for C. difficile toxin showed little evidence of a fall in testing during the steepest infection rate reductions, suggesting that this was not a major factor in the decline in CDI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)850.e1-850.e4
JournalClinical Microbiology and Infection
Volume21
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
All of the authors work for Public Health England, which is funded by the British Government . None of the authors have anything else to declare.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015.

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile
  • England
  • Objectives
  • Stool samples
  • Toxin testing

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