Co-infections, secondary infections, and antimicrobial use in patients hospitalised with COVID-19 during the first pandemic wave from the ISARIC WHO CCP-UK study: a multicentre, prospective cohort study

ISARIC4C Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Microbiological characterisation of co-infections and secondary infections in patients with COVID-19 is lacking, and antimicrobial use is high. We aimed to describe microbiologically confirmed co-infections and secondary infections, and antimicrobial use, in patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19.

Methods: The International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infections Consortium (ISARIC) WHO Clinical Characterisation Protocol UK (CCP-UK) study is an ongoing, prospective cohort study recruiting inpatients from 260 hospitals in England, Scotland, and Wales, conducted by the ISARIC Coronavirus Clinical Characterisation Consortium. Patients with a confirmed or clinician-defined high likelihood of SARS-CoV-2 infection were eligible for inclusion in the ISARIC WHO CCP-UK study. For this specific study, we excluded patients with a recorded negative SARS-CoV-2 test result and those without a recorded outcome at 28 days after admission. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, therapeutic, and outcome data were collected using a prespecified case report form. Organisms considered clinically insignificant were excluded.

Findings: We analysed data from 48 902 patients admitted to hospital between Feb 6 and June 8, 2020. The median patient age was 74 years (IQR 59–84) and 20 786 (42·6%) of 48 765 patients were female. Microbiological investigations were recorded for 8649 (17·7%) of 48 902 patients, with clinically significant COVID-19-related respiratory or bloodstream culture results recorded for 1107 patients. 762 (70·6%) of 1080 infections were secondary, occurring more than 2 days after hospital admission. Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae were the most common pathogens causing respiratory co-infections (diagnosed ≤2 days after admission), with Enterobacteriaceae and S aureus most common in secondary respiratory infections. Bloodstream infections were most frequently caused by Escherichia coli and S aureus. Among patients with available data, 13 390 (37·0%) of 36 145 had received antimicrobials in the community for this illness episode before hospital admission and 39 258 (85·2%) of 46 061 patients with inpatient antimicrobial data received one or more antimicrobials at some point during their admission (highest for patients in critical care). We identified frequent use of broad-spectrum agents and use of carbapenems rather than carbapenem-sparing alternatives.

Interpretation: In patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19, microbiologically confirmed bacterial infections are rare, and more likely to be secondary infections. Gram-negative organisms and S aureus are the predominant pathogens. The frequency and nature of antimicrobial use are concerning, but tractable targets for stewardship interventions exist.

Funding: National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, UK Department for International Development, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, EU Platform for European Preparedness Against (Re-)emerging Epidemics, NIHR Health Protection Research Unit (HPRU) in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections at University of Liverpool, and NIHR HPRU in Respiratory Infections at Imperial College London.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e354-e365
Number of pages12
JournalThe Lancet Microbe
Volume2
Issue number8
Early online date2 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This work used data provided by patients and collected by the NHS as part of patient care and support. We are extremely grateful to the 2648 front-line NHS clinical and research staff and volunteer medical students who collected these data in challenging circumstances, and the generosity of the participants and their families for their individual contributions in these difficult times. We also acknowledge the support of Jeremy J Farrar (Wellcome Trust) and Nahoko Shindo (WHO). This work is supported by grants from the NIHR (award CO-CIN-01), the MRC (grant MC_PC_19059), and by the NIHR HPRU in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections at University of Liverpool in partnership with Public Health England (PHE), in collaboration with the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and the University of Oxford (award 200907), NIHR HPRU in Respiratory Infections at Imperial College London with PHE (award 200927), Wellcome Trust and the UK Department for International Development ( 215091/Z/18/Z ), Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation ( OPP1209135 ), Liverpool Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre ( grant reference C18616/A25153 ), NIHR BRC at Imperial College London (IS-BRC-1215-20013), EU Platform for European Preparedness Against (Re-)emerging Epidemics (PREPARE; FP7 project 602525), and NIHR Clinical Research Network. LT is supported by a Wellcome Trust fellowship ( 205228/Z/16/Z ). PJMO is supported by a NIHR Senior Investigator Award (award 201385). This research was funded in whole, or in part, by the Wellcome Trust. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the UK DHSC, the UK Department for International Development, NIHR, MRC, Wellcome Trust, or PHE.

All authors declare support from the NIHR, the Medical Research Council (MRC), the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit (HPRU) in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections at University of Liverpool, the NIHR HPRU in Respiratory Infections at Imperial College London, the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) at Imperial College London, and the NIHR Clinical Research Network, for the submitted work. ABD reports grants from the UK Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC), during the conduct of the study, and grants from Wellcome Trust, outside the submitted work. PJMO reports personal fees from consultancies (GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen, Bavarian Nordic, Pfizer, and Cepheid) and from the European Respiratory Society, grants from MRC, MRC Global Challenge Research Fund, the EU, NIHR BRC, MRC–GlaxoSmithKline, Wellcome Trust, NIHR (HPRU in Respiratory Infection), and is an NIHR senior investigator outside the submitted work. PJMO's role as President of the British Society for Immunology was unpaid but travel and accommodation at some meetings was provided by the Society. JKB reports grants from MRC. MGS reports grants from DHSC, NIHR UK, MRC, HPRU in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, and University of Liverpool, during the conduct of the study, and is chair of the scientific advisory board and a minority share holder at Integrum Scientific, outside the submitted work.

Open Access: This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license.

Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Citation: Russell, Clark D., et al. "Co-infections, secondary infections, and antimicrobial use in patients hospitalised with COVID-19 during the first pandemic wave from the ISARIC WHO CCP-UK study: a multicentre, prospective cohort study." The Lancet Microbe (2021).

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S2666-5247(21)00090-2

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Co-infections, secondary infections, and antimicrobial use in patients hospitalised with COVID-19 during the first pandemic wave from the ISARIC WHO CCP-UK study: a multicentre, prospective cohort study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this