Comparison of antimicrobial resistance genes in nontyphoidal salmonellae of serotypes enteritidis, Hadar, and Virchow from humans and food-producing animals in England and Wales

Katie L. Hopkins*, Miranda J. Batchelor, Muna Anjum, Rob H. Davies, E. John Threlfall

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Isolates of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis (n = 17), Hadar (n = 18), and Virchow (n = 13) from cases of human infection and from food production animals were screened using a miniaturized antimicrobial microarray to determine the number and spectra of resistance genes. Among Enteritidis, the number of genes detected was: animal isolates, mean = 4.6; human isolates, mean = 5.3. Resistance to streptomycin, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides was usually encoded by only one resistance gene in animal isolates, but human isolates often carried more than one gene encoding resistance to the same class of antimicrobial. Among Hadar, the number of genes detected was: animal isolates, mean = 2.0; human strains, mean = 2.6. Resistance to streptomycin was encoded by strA, rather than aadA genes because these were detected in only one human isolate. Among Virchow, the number of genes detected was: animal isolates, mean = 1.6; human isolates, mean = 5.6. As with Enteritidis, human Hadar isolates often carried more than one gene encoding resistance to the same class of antimicrobial. Due to the complexity of routes of transmission of Salmonella spp. from food production animals to humans, full phenotypic and genotypic comparison of resistant isolates is critical in ascertaining the sources of resistant isolates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)281-288
Number of pages8
JournalMicrobial Drug Resistance
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2007

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