COVID-19 and Ventilation in the Home; Investigating Peoples’ Perceptions and Self-Reported Behaviour (the COVID-19 Rapid Survey of Adherence to Interventions and Responses [CORSAIR] Study)

Louise E. Smith*, Henry W.W. Potts, Richard Amlȏt, Nicola T. Fear, Susan Michie, G. James Rubin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

Abstract

Ventilating indoor spaces helps prevent COVID-19 transmission. We investigated self-reported rates of opening windows to improve ventilation in the home, perceived effectiveness of opening windows, and confidence that if you wanted to, you could open windows. One in 6 people reported rarely, if ever, opening windows in their home in the last week. Three in 4 people knew that opening windows to improve ventilation was an effective way to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and 5 in 6 were confident that they could open windows in their home. Official messaging should continue to seek to improve knowledge about the effectiveness of ventilation for reducing COVID-19 transmission, and increase the frequency of window opening.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEnvironmental Health Insights
Volume15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: LS, RA and GJR are supported by the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Emergency Preparedness and Response, a partnership between Public Health England, King’s College London and the University of East Anglia. HWWP receives funding from Public Health England and NHS England. NTF is part funded by a grant from the UK Ministry of Defence. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR, Public Health England, the Department of Health and Social Care or the UK Ministry of Defence. The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) funded data collection.

Funding Information:
The authors would like to thank Professor Catherine Noakes for her contribution to the manuscript. The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: LS, RA and GJR are supported by the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Emergency Preparedness and Response, a partnership between Public Health England, King?s College London and the University of East Anglia. HWWP receives funding from Public Health England and NHS England. NTF is part funded by a grant from the UK Ministry of Defence. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR, Public Health England, the Department of Health and Social Care or the UK Ministry of Defence. The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) funded data collection. Surveys were commissioned and funded by DHSC, with the authors providing advice on the question design and selection. DHSC had no role in analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Preliminary results were made available to DHSC and the UK?s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE).

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2021.

Keywords

  • confidence
  • COVID-19
  • effectiveness
  • self-efficacy
  • ventilation

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