Effectiveness of haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine for prevention of meningitis in senegal

Jessica A. Fleming, Yakou Dieye, Ousseynou Ba, Boniface Mutombo Wa Mutombo, Ndiouga Diallo, Pape Coumba Faye, Mamadou Ba, Moussa Fafa Cisse, Aissatou Gaye Diallo, Mady Ba, Mary Slack, Noel S. Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A total of 24 cases of hospitalized, laboratory-confirmed Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) meningitis were identified through a regional pediatric bacterial meningitis surveillance system. Each case was matched by age and residence to 4 neighborhood controls. The adjusted vaccine effectiveness for ≥2 doses was 95.8% (95% confidence interval, 67.9%-99.4%). Hib vaccine appears to be highly effective in preventing Hib meningitis in Senegal.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)430-432
Number of pages3
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported by The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Funding Information:
With funding from the GAVI Alliance, the Senegal Ministry of Health (MOH) introduced Hib conjugate vaccine into their routine immunization program in July 2005. The case–control study described in this study is part of the Hib Impact Project, a collaborative evaluation of the burden of Hib disease in the country, conducted by the MOH and PATH, an international, nonprofit organization. It includes cases identified through a regional pediatric bacterial meningitis (PBM) surveillance system and provides additional evidence for ongoing support of Hib vaccine by the MOH, when Senegal's GAVI Alliance vaccine donation ends in 2010.

Keywords

  • bacterial meningitis
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine
  • Senegal
  • vaccine effectiveness

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