General outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease associated with fish and shellfish, England and Wales, 1992-1999.

I. A. Gillespie*, Goutam Adak, S. J. O'Brien, M. M. Brett, F. J. Bolton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Between 1992 and 1999 1425 foodborne general outbreaks of Infectious Intestinal Disease (IID) were reported to the PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre. Of these, 148 (10%) were associated with the consumption of fish and shellfish. Three main aetiologies were identified. Outbreaks associated with fish (47%) occurred more frequently in the summer months, and were linked with Scombrotoxic fish poisoning caused by the consumption of tuna that was improperly stored. Outbreaks associated with molluscs (36%) were associated with the consumption of oysters contaminated with viral pathogens, particularly in February. Outbreaks associated with the consumption of crustaceans (11%) often involved eating prawns that contained either salmonellas or viral pathogens. The maintenance of microbial quality from prior to capture/harvesting until the moment of consumption, based on a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point style approach, is essential if gastrointestinal illness associated with such produce is to be avoided.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-123
Number of pages7
JournalCommunicable disease and public health / PHLS
Volume4
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2001

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