Group-and genotype-specific neutralizing antibody responses against respiratory syncytial virus in infants and young children with severe pneumonia

Charles J. Sande*, Martin N. Mutunga, Graham F. Medley, Patricia Cane, D. James Nokes

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    25 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The effect of genetic variation on the neutralizing antibody response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is poorly understood. In this study, acute-and convalescent-phase sera were evaluated against different RSV strains. The proportion of individuals with homologous seroconversion was greater than that among individuals with heterologous seroconversion among those infected with RSV group A (50% vs 12.5%; P =. 0005) or RSV group B (40% vs 8%; P =. 008). Seroconversion to BA genotype or non-BA genotype test viruses was similar among individuals infected with non-BA virus (35% vs 50%; P =. 4) or BA virus (50% vs 65%; P =. 4). The RSV neutralizing response is group specific. The BA-associated genetic change did not confer an ability to escape neutralizing responses to previous non-BA viruses.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)489-492
    Number of pages4
    JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
    Volume207
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2013

    Bibliographical note

    Funding Information:
    Financial support. This work was supported by the Wellcome Trust (grant 084633) and a Wellcome Trust PhD studentship (grant 083085 to C. J. S.). Potential conflict of interest. All authors: No reported conflicts. All authors have submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest. Conflicts that the editors consider relevant to the content of the manuscript have been disclosed.

    Keywords

    • immunity
    • neutralizing antibody
    • respiratory syncytial virus

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