Increased detection of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase M184V mutation using mutation-specific minority assays in a UK surveillance study suggests evidence of unrecognized transmitted drug resistance

A. J. Buckton, D. Prabhu, C. Motamed, R. J. Harris, C. Hill, Gary Murphy, John Parry, J. A. Johnson, Catherine Lowndes, N. Gill, D. Pillay, Patricia Cane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to estimate the levels of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in HIV-1 using very sensitive assays to detect minority drug-resistant populations. Methods: We tested unlinked anonymous serum specimens from sexual health clinic attendees, who had not received an HIV diagnosis at the time of sampling, by both standard genotyping and using minority detection assays. Results: By standard genotyping, 21 of 165 specimens (12.7%) showed evidence of drug resistance, while, using a combination of standard genotyping and minority mutation assays targeting three commonly observed drug resistance mutations which cause high-level resistance to commonly prescribed first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART), this rose to 32 of 165 (19.4%). This increase of 45% in drug resistance levels [95% confidence interval (CI) 15.2-83.7%; P=0.002] was statistically significant. Almost all of this increase was accounted for by additional detections of the M184V mutation. Conclusions: Future surveillance studies of TDR in the United Kingdom should consider combining standard genotyping and minority-specific assays to provide more accurate estimates, particularly when using specimens collected from chronic HIV infections in which TDR variants may have declined to low levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)250-254
Number of pages5
JournalHIV Medicine
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

Keywords

  • Drug resistance
  • HIV-1
  • Minority-specific polymerase chain reaction
  • Surveillance

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Increased detection of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase M184V mutation using mutation-specific minority assays in a UK surveillance study suggests evidence of unrecognized transmitted drug resistance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this