Investigating the impact of clinical anaesthetic practice on bacterial contamination of intravenous fluids and drugs

N. Mahida*, K. Levi, Angela Kearns, S. Snape, I. Moppett

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Syringes (N=426), ventilator machine swabs (N=202) and intravenous (IV) fluid administration sets (N=47) from 101 surgical cases were evaluated for bacterial contamination. Cultures from the external surface of syringe tips and syringe contents were positive in 46% and 15% of cases, respectively. The same bacterial species was cultured from both ventilator and syringe in 13% of cases, and was also detected in the IV fluid administration set in two cases. A significant association was found between emergency cases and contaminated syringes (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.37-14.8; P=0.01). Other risk factors included not using gloves and failure to cap syringes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)70-74
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume90
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funded by a small grant (grant number 13/06 ) from the Healthcare Infection Society .

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society.

Copyright:
Copyright 2016 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Anaesthesia
  • Intravenous fluids
  • Surgery
  • Syringe

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