Low treatment initiation rates among multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients in Gauteng, South Africa, 2011

Joy I. Ebonwu, K. S. Tint, Chikwe Ihekweazu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

SETTING: Gauteng, South Africa. OBJECTIVE: To determine treatment uptake among newly diagnosed multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) patients and risk markers for non-initiation of treatment. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted including all newly diagnosed MDR-TB patients in Gauteng Province, South Africa, in 2011. Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of those who attended Sizwe Hospital, the designated MDR-TB hospital, were extracted from their medical records. District health offices provided data on patients not seen at Sizwe Hospital. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to determine risk markers for non-initiation of treatment. RESULTS: Of the 942 newly diagnosed MDR-TB patients in Gauteng, only 593 (63%) initiated treatment. Of these, 70 (11.8%) did not maintain treatment up to the fourth month. Among the 349 (37%) who did not initiate treatment, 31.2% died and 46.4% could not be accounted for. Referral for laboratory diagnosis from hospitals, health district of the laboratory diagnosis, human immunodeficiency virus infection and place of residence were independently associated with non-initiation of MDR-TB treatment. CONCLUSION: Untreated patients continue to transmit MDR-TB in the community. These study findings highlight the need to identify and target the causes of noninitiation of treatment in specific settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1043-1048
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2013

Keywords

  • Death
  • MDR-TB transmission
  • Patient tracing
  • Risk markers
  • Untreated patients

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