Neonatal infection with G10P[11] rotavirus did not confer protection against subsequent rotavirus infection in a community cohort in Vellore, South India

Indrani Banerjee, Beryl Primrose Gladstone, Andrea M. Le Fevre, Sasirekha Ramani, Miren Iturriza-Go'Mara, James J. Gray, David Brown, Mary K. Estes, Jaya Prakash Muliyil, Shabbar Jaffar, Gagandeep Kang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Various observational studies have suggested that neonatal rotavirus infection confers protection against diarrhea due to subsequent rotavirus infection. We examined the incidence of rotavirus infection and diarrhea during the first 2 years of life among children infected with the G10P[11] rotavirus strain during the neonatal period and those not infected with rotavirus. Methods. Children were recruited at birth and were followed up at least twice weekly. Stool samples, collected every 2 weeks for surveillance and at each episode of diarrhea, were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction. Results. Among 33 children infected neonatally with G10P[11] and 300 children not infected with rotavirus, there was no significant difference in the rates of rotavirus-positive diarrhea (rate ratio [RR], 1.05 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.61-1.79]), moderate or severe rotavirus-positive diarrhea (RR, 1.42 [95% CI, 0.73-2.78]), or asymptomatic rotavirus shedding (RR, 1.25 [95% CI, 0.85-1.83]). Conclusion. Neonatal G10P[11] infection with a strain resembling a vaccine candidate did not confer protection against subsequent rotavirus infection or diarrhea of any severity in this setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)625-632
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume195
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2007

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