No evidence of transmission of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza to humans after unprotected contact with infected wild swans

A. Wallensten, M. Salter, S. Bennett, I. Brown, Katja Hoschler, Maria Oliver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) subtype H5N1 remains a public health threat as long as it circulates in wild and domestic birds. Information on the transmissibility of H5N1 HPAI from wild birds is needed for evidence-based public health advice. We investigated if transmission of H5N1 HPAI had taken place in people that had unprotected contact with infected wild mute swans during an incident at the Abbotsbury Swannery in Dorset, England. Thirteen people who had been exposed to infected swans were contacted and actively followed up for symptoms. Serology was taken after 30 days. We did not find evidence of transmission of H5N1 HPAI to humans during the incident. The incident provided a rare opportunity to study the transmissibility of the virus from wild birds to humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)210-213
Number of pages4
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume138
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • Avian flu
  • Influenza A
  • Transmission
  • Zoonoses

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