Policies in accountable contracts

Brian Shand, J. Bacon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, accounting policies explicitly control resource usage within a contract architecture. Combined with a virtual resource economy, this allows efficient exchange of high-level computer services between untrustworthy participants. These services are specified as contracts, which must be signed by the participants to take effect. Each contract expresses its accounting policy using a limited language, with high expressiveness but predictable execution times. This is evaluated within a novel resource economy, in which physical resources, trust and money are treated homogeneously. A second-order trust model continually updates trustworthiness opinions, based on contract performance; trust delegation certificates support flexible, distributed extension of these trust relationships. The introspectible contracts, resource and trust models together provide accountability and resilience, which are particularly important for large-scale distributed computation initiatives such as the Grid. Thus participants can take calculated risks, based on expressed policies and trust, and rationally choose which contracts to perform.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 3rd International Workshop on Policies for Distributed Systems and Networks, POLICY 2002
Pages80-91
Number of pages12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes
Event3rd International Workshop on Policies for Distributed Systems and Networks, POLICY 2002 - Monterey, CA, United States
Duration: 5 Jun 20027 Jun 2002

Publication series

NameProceedings - 3rd International Workshop on Policies for Distributed Systems and Networks, POLICY 2002

Conference

Conference3rd International Workshop on Policies for Distributed Systems and Networks, POLICY 2002
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityMonterey, CA
Period5/06/027/06/02

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