Real-world persistence with antiretroviral therapy for HIV in the United Kingdom: A multicentre retrospective cohort study

Joseph M. Lewis*, Colette Smith, Adele Torkington, Craig Davies, Shazaad Ahmad, Andrew Tomkins, Jonathan Shaw, Margaret Kingston, Ghadeer Muqbill, Philip Hay, Larissa Mulka, Deborah Williams, Laura Waters, Nataliya Brima, Neal Marshall, Margaret Johnson, Mas Chaponda, Mark Nelson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives Persistence with an antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen for HIV can be defined as the length of time a patient remains on therapy before stopping or switching. We aimed to describe ART persistence in treatment naïve patients starting therapy in the United Kingdom, and to describe differential persistence by treatment regimen. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study at eight UK centres of ART-naïve adults commencing ART between 2012 and 2015. Aggregate data were extracted from local treatment databases. Time to discontinuation was compared for different third agents and NRTI backbones using incidence rates. Results 1949 patients contributed data to the analysis. Rate of third agent change was 28 per 100 person-years of follow up [95% CI 26–31] and NRTI backbone change of 15 per 100 person-years of follow up [95% CI 14–17]). Rilpivirine, as co-formulated rilpivirine/tenofovir/emtricitabine had a significantly lower discontinuation rate than all other third agents and, excluding single tablet regimens, co-formulated tenofovir/emtricitabine had a significantly lower discontinuation rate than co-formulated abacavir/lamivudine. The reasons for discontinuation were not well recorded. Conclusions Treatment discontinuation is not an uncommon event. Rilpivirine had a significantly lower discontinuation rate than other third agents and tenofovir/emtricitabine a lower rate than co-formulated abacavir/lamivudine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-407
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infection
Volume74
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
MN conceived the study. CS collated data and performed statistical analysis. JL wrote the manuscript with support from MC. All authors contributed to data collection and revising the manuscript for publication. No specific funding was received for this study. Joseph Lewis is supported by the Wellcome Trust as a clinical PhD fellow (grant number 109105/Z/15/Z).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 The Author(s)

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Antiretroviral therapy
  • ART
  • HIV
  • Persistence

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