Risk factors for late HIV diagnosis in the East of England: evidence from national surveillance data and policy implications

Rachel E. Bath, Lynsey Emmett, Neville Verlander, Mark Reacher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2014, 42% of all HIV diagnoses in the East of England were diagnosed late. Individuals unaware of their HIV status will not benefit from lifesaving and infectious-limiting antiretroviral therapy, and they remain at risk of decreased life expectancy and onward transmission of HIV. We sought to identify risk factors associated with late HIV diagnosis in the East of England to inform future HIV testing and prevention strategies relevant to the local population. Data on all HIV infected individuals aged ≥16 years and diagnosed between 2008 and 2014 in the East of England were obtained from the national HIV and AIDS Reporting System. Late diagnosis was defined as CD4 cell count below 350 cells/mm 3 within 91 days of diagnosis. Logistic regression investigated risk factors for late HIV diagnosis. A total of 2469 people were included; 1342 (54%) were late HIV diagnoses. In multivariable analysis risk factors for late diagnosis were: age ≥30 years, originating from WHO regions of South-East Asia or Europe (excluding UK), heterosexual orientation and being diagnosed as an inpatient or by a general practitioner. The odds of late diagnosis significantly reduced every year (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.90–0.99, p = 0.042). Despite this year-on-year reduction continued high rates suggest future HIV testing and prevention strategies should be informed by local regional epidemiology to allow those at greatest risk to be targeted appropriately.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-44
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • epidemiology
  • Europe
  • HIV
  • prevention

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