Role of chronic infection and inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract in the etiology and pathogenesis of idiopathic parkinsonism. Part 3: Predicted probability and gradients of severity of idiopathic parkinsonism based on H. pylori antibody profile

Clive Weller, Andre Charlett, Norman L. Oxlade, Sylvia M. Dobbs, R. John Dobbs, Dale W. Peterson, Ingvar T. Bjarnason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Eradicating Helicobacter may convert rapidly progressive idiopathic parkinsonism to quieter disease, however only a minority of probands have evidence of current infection. Aim. To explore the cross-sectional fit of parkinsonism as an extra-alimentary consequence of Helicobacter pylori, using the serum antibody profile. Methods. A discriminant index for parkinsonism was based on the Western Blot pattern of IgG antibodies against electrophoretically separated H. pylori antigens in 124 subjects with idiopathic parkinsonism, 196 without. In parkinsonism, association was assessed between index and 1, anthropomeric measures; 2, current and 3, increase over 4 years in hypokinetic and psychomotor/psychometric disability; and 4, a global score of current severity. Results. Predicted probability of being labeled parkinsonian was greatest with cytotoxin-associated-gene-product (CagA) positivity and vacuolating-toxin negativity (p = .03 and .004, respectively, for antibody-age interactions), and urease-B negativity (p = .03, irrespective of age). In this circumstance, the odds for parkinsonism increased fivefold by age 80 years (p = .001). Helicobacter status, according to anti-urease enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), did not complement the model. Gradients, of clinically relevant size, were found between index and disease burden, despite the potentially confounding effect of antiparkinsonian medication. The higher the index 1, the worse was posture, as gauged by forward displacement of occiput (p = .04), 2, the shorter mean stride-length (p = .003), longer reaction time (= .002) and lesser cognitive efficiency (= .03), 3, the greater their deterioration (p = .006, .002, and .03 respectively), and 4, the greater the overall severity of parkinsonism (< .001). Conclusion. The apparent importance of H. pylori in the etiology/pathogenesis of idiopathic parkinsonism is not confined to those with evidence of current infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)288-297
Number of pages10
JournalHelicobacter
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • Biological gradients
  • Biomarker
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Idiopathic parkinsonism
  • Objective measures facets
  • Serum antibody immunoblot profile

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