Salmonellosis outbreak with novel Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype (11:z41:e,n,z15) attributable to sesame products in five European countries, 2016 to 2017

Anika Meinen, Sandra Simon, Sangeeta Banerji, Istvan Szabo, Burkhard Malorny, Maria Borowiak, Sead Hadziabdic, Natalie Becker, Petra Luber, Dorothee Lohr, Carolin Harms, Anita Plenge-Bönig, Kassiani Mellou, Georgia Mandilara, Joël Mossong, Catherine Ragimbeau, Pierre Weicherding, Patrick Hau, Daniela Dědičová, Lucie ŠafaříkováSatheesh Nair, Tim Dallman, Lesley Larkin, Jacquelyn McCormick, Elizabeth de Pinna, Ettore Severi, Saara Kotila, Taina Niskanen, Valentina Rizzi, Domenico Deserio, Antje Flieger, Klaus Stark

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In spring 2016, Greece reported an outbreak caused by a previously undescribed Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype (antigenic formula 11:z41:e,n,z15) via the Epidemic Intelligence Information System for Food- and Waterborne Diseases and Zoonoses (EPIS-FWD), with epidemiological evidence for sesame products as presumptive vehicle. Subsequently, Germany, Czech Republic, Luxembourg and the United Kingdom (UK) reported infections with this novel serotype via EPIS-FWD. Concerned countries in collaboration with the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) adopted a common outbreak case definition. An outbreak case was defined as a laboratory-confirmed notification of the novel Salmonella serotype. Between March 2016 and April 2017, 47 outbreak cases were notified (Greece: n = 22; Germany: n = 13; Czech Republic: n = 5; Luxembourg: n = 4; UK: n = 3). Whole genome sequencing revealed the very close genetic relatedness of isolates from all affected countries. Interviews focusing on sesame product consumption, suspicious food item testing and trace-back analysis following Salmonella spp. detection in food products identified a company in Greece where sesame seeds from different countries were processed. Through European collaboration, it was possible to identify and recall sesame spread as one contaminated food item serving as vehicle of infection and trace it back to its origin.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1800543
JournalEurosurveillance
Volume24
Issue number36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Sep 2019

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