Screening for tuberculosis among high-risk groups attending London emergency departments: a prospective observational study

Rishi K. Gupta, Swaib A. Lule, Maria Krutikov, Lara Gosce, Nathan Green, Jo Southern, Ambreen Imran, Robert W. Aldridge, Heinke Kunst, Marc Lipman, William Lynn, Helen Burgess, Asif Rahman, Dee Menezes, Ananna Rahman, Simon Tiberi, Peter J. White, Ibrahim Abubakar*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Article number2003831
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Respiratory Journal
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Conflict of interest: R.K. Gupta has nothing to disclose. S.A. Lule has nothing to disclose. M. Krutikov has nothing to disclose. L. Gosce has nothing to disclose. N. Green has nothing to disclose. J. Southern has nothing to disclose. A. Imran has nothing to disclose. R.W. Aldridge has nothing to disclose. H. Kunst has nothing to disclose. M. Lipman has nothing to disclose. W. Lynn has nothing to disclose. H. Burgess has nothing to disclose. A. Rahman has nothing to disclose. D. Menezes has nothing to disclose. A. Rahman has nothing to disclose. S. Tiberi has nothing to disclose. P.J. White reports grants from Medical Research Council and National Institute for Health Research, during the conduct of the study; grants from National Institute for Health Research, outside the submitted work. I. Abubakar reports grants from UK Department of Health, during the conduct of the study.

Funding Information:
Support statement: This work was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) through Policy Research Programme (reference 015/0307), and personal awards (DRF-2018-11-ST2-004 to R.K. Gupta; 206602/Z/17/Z to R.W. Aldridge; SRF-2011-04-001 to I. Abubakar; NF-SI-0616-10037 to I. Abubakar). P.J. White, I. Abubakar and N. Green received funding from NIHR Health Technology Assessment (NIHR127459). S.A. Lule was supported by the PANDORA-ID-NET Consortium (EDCTP Reg/Grant RIA2016E-1609) funded by the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP2) programme under the Horizon 2020, the European Union’s Framework Programme for Research and Innovation. P.J. White and N. Green acknowledge funding from the UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Protection Research Unit (HPRU) in Modelling Methodology at Imperial College London, in partnership with Public Health England (HPRU-2012-10080). P.J. White also thanks the NIHR HPRU in Modelling and Health Economics, a partnership between PHE, Imperial College London and LSHTM, for funding (NIHR200908). P.J. White also acknowledges support from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis (MR/R015600/1); this award is jointly funded by the MRC and the UK Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) under the MRC/FCDO Concordat agreement and is also part of the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership 2 (EDCTP2) programme supported by the EU. This paper presents independent research supported by the NIHR. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the Department of Health and Social Care, FCDO, MRC, NHS, NIHR, or Public Health England. Funding information for this article has been deposited with the Crossref Funder Registry.

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