Sexual behaviour in Britain: Why sexually transmitted infections are common

Kevin Fenton*, Gwenda Hughes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although substantial declines in sexually transmitted infection (STI) incidence were observed throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, new diagnoses of STIs have risen continually since 1996. Distinct 'core groups', such as teenage women, gay and bisexual men and some ethnic minorities, bear a disproportionate burden of disease. Substantial increase in high-risk sexual behaviours seen in the British population over the past decade is probably the main driving force behind the recent rises in STIs, although aspects of health service provision and use also play a role. The increasing burden of infection will compound the workload problems already experienced by overstretched genitourinary medicine clinics, such that the quality and effectiveness of clinic-based interventions may suffer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)199-202
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Medicine, Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of London
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Keywords

  • Sex
  • Sexual behaviour
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Transmission

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sexual behaviour in Britain: Why sexually transmitted infections are common'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this