Some factors affecting rubella seronegative prevalence among pregnant women in a NorthWest England region between April 2011 and March 2013

Michael Ogundele*, Samuel Ghebrehewet, Anu Chawla

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background Rubella is usually a mild viral illness, but during pregnancy, it can have potentially devastating effects causing fetal losses and severe congenital malformations (congenital rubella syndrome). Rubella is now rare in most developed countries following a successful vaccination programme.We aimed to investigate differences in epidemiological profile of pregnant women screened antenatally in Liverpool to identify risk factors for rubella immunity. Methods All samples were tested with the Elecsys Rubella IgG immunoassay kit. A result ,10 IU/ml was considered to be seronegative. Results The seronegativity prevalence among pregnant women in Liverpool (6.3%) is higher than average value for the NorthWest region (3.7%). The seronegative rates varied with age (15.4% for ,15 years, 18.7% for 15-20 years, compared with 2% for 30-35 years). The areas with the highest seronegative rates correspond with areas of Liverpool with high pockets of socioeconomic deprivation. Conclusion The highest proportion of seronegative women were among the youngest age groups. Local areas with highest level of deprivation should be given priority and additional resources to develop targeted programmes and pathways to implement appropriate interventions such as MMR catch-up programmes and put in place arrangements for offering MMR vaccination in maternity units.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)243-249
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Public Health
    Volume38
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2016

    Keywords

    • Communicable diseases
    • Epidemiology
    • Pregnancy and childbirth disorders

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