The transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in high burden settings

Tom A. Yates*, Palwasha Y. Khan, Gwenan M. Knight, Jonathon G. Taylor, Timothy D. McHugh, Marc Lipman, Richard G. White, Ted Cohen, Frank G. Cobelens, Robin Wood, David A.J. Moore, Ibrahim Abubakar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Unacceptable levels of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission are noted in high burden settings and a renewed focus on reducing person-to-person transmission in these communities is needed. We review recent developments in the understanding of airborne transmission. We outline approaches to measure transmission in populations and trials and describe the Wells-Riley equation, which is used to estimate transmission risk in indoor spaces. Present research priorities include the identification of effective strategies for tuberculosis infection control, improved understanding of where transmission occurs and the transmissibility of drug-resistant strains, and estimates of the effect of HIV and antiretroviral therapy on transmission dynamics. When research is planned and interventions are designed to interrupt transmission, resource constraints that are common in high burden settings-including shortages of health-care workers-must be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-238
Number of pages12
JournalThe Lancet Infectious Diseases
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This Review was written after the M tuberculosis transmission meeting, held in London in November, 2014, which was funded by the TB Modelling and Analysis Consortium (OPP1084276), University College of London Population Health Domain, and the TB Centre at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. TAY is funded with a studentship from the Medical Research Council (UK). PYK is funded by the Wellcome Trust clinical research training fellowship. RGW is funded by the Medical Research Council (UK), the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Centres for Disease Control/President''s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief through the Aurum Institute, and the US Agency for International Development/International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease/The Union North America. TC is funded by a National Institutes of Health Research Project Grant (R01 AI112438–01). IA is funded by the UK Medical Research Council, National Institute for Health Research, and Public Health England.

Funding Information:
This Review was written after the M tuberculosis transmission meeting , held in London in November, 2014, which was funded by the TB Modelling and Analysis Consortium ( OPP1084276 ), University College of London Population Health Domain , and the TB Centre at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine . TAY is funded with a studentship from the Medical Research Council (UK) . PYK is funded by the Wellcome Trust clinical research training fellowship. The research was partly funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare Associated infection and Antimicrobial resistance at Imperial College London in partnership with Public Health England . The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of of the NHS, the NIHR, the Department of Health, or Public Health England. RGW is funded by the Medical Research Council (UK) , the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation , Centres for Disease Control/President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief through the Aurum Institute , and the US Agency for International Development / International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease / The Union North America . TC is funded by a National Institutes of Health Research Project Grant ( R01 AI112438–01 ). IA is funded by the UK Medical Research Council , NIHR , and Public Health England .

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

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